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Jurors get instruction on reasons to spare life of Colorado theater gunman James Holmes

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CENTENNIAL, Colorado — Jurors in the Colorado movie theater trial received instructions Thursday before their next round of deliberations to decide if there are any reasons to override a potential death penalty and sentence James Holmes to life without parole for 12 murders and 70 attempted murders.

The lengthy instructions were the last step before closing arguments in this phase of his sentencing, which focused on Holmes' childhood, his mental illness, his connections to people who love him and other potentially mitigating factors that would reduce his "moral culpability" and make him worthy of their mercy.

Last week, jurors unanimously agreed that James Holmes' 2012 attack was cruel enough to justify the death penalty. Now, their focus is on whether his life should be spared nevertheless.

If they decide the death penalty is still an option, they would move to a final phase in which they would hear from victims and survivors.

Judge Carlos A. Samour Jr. described the potentially mitigating factors as any facts or circumstances in his personal history, background or mental health that make capital punishment inappropriate, despite the horrific nature of his crimes three years ago.

As examples, the judge said Holmes is asserting a series factors that point to mercy, including his age and emotional state at the time of the crime, his limited capacity to appreciate the wrongfulness of his conduct, his cooperation with authorities, and any other evidence introduced by his defense.

More specifically, he said dozens of factors presented by the defense should be considered, including:

— All experts agree Holmes suffers from schizophrenia — that he's not faking the illness that caused the events, and that if he had been healthy, the crimes would not have taken place;

PHOTO: In this image made from Colorado Judicial Department video, Arlene Holmes, top right, the mother of James Holmes, third from left, in white shirt, stand for the jury to leave for a break in testimony during the sentencing phase of the Colorado theater shooting trial in Centennial, Colo., on Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Once they begin deliberating on the sentence, the Holmes jury will be charged with deciding if Holmes is to be executed, or if any mitigating evidence, such as mental health issues, warrants instead life in prison. (Colorado Judicial Department via AP, Pool)
In this image made from Colorado Judicial Department video, Arlene Holmes, top right, the mother of James Holmes, third from left, in white shirt, stand for the jury to leave for a break in testimony during the sentencing phase of the Colorado theater shooting trial in Centennial, Colo., on Wednesday, July 29, 2015. Once they begin deliberating on the sentence, the Holmes jury will be charged with deciding if Holmes is to be executed, or if any mitigating evidence, such as mental health issues, warrants instead life in prison. (Colorado Judicial Department via AP, Pool)

— That "Mr. Holmes was genetically loaded to experience a psychotic disorder," given the extensive history of schizophrenia on his father's side of the family;

— That he was 24 in 2012, the age when schizophrenics most frequently experience the onset of mental illness;

— That he was never arrested before of a crime;

— That he was raised in a loving home, surrounded by caring friends and neighbors;

— That many people who encountered him later in Colorado missed signals that his mind was deteriorating;

— And that the drugs he was prescribed could have increased his mania and other dangerous symptoms.

The nine women and three men were to hear closing arguments from the defense and prosecutors later Thursday before beginning deliberations in this much more subjective phase of the trial. All jurors have to agree that Holmes is still eligible for the death penalty before the trial would advance to a third and final phase.

The last witness Wednesday was Arlene Holmes, who said she had no idea her son had been talking about killing people. She said her son's campus psychiatrist never told her that he had homicidal thoughts when she called in June 2012 and revealed he was quitting therapy and dropping out of school.

"Schizophrenia chose him; he didn't choose it, and I still love my son. I still do," she said through her sobs.

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