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AP News in Brief at 5:58 a.m. EDT

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Debate stage drama: Republican presidential candidates await top 10 announcement

WASHINGTON — They crowded the stage in New Hampshire for a debate-style faceoff.

But the jam-packed Republican field will be narrowed considerably for the first formal debate of the 2016 primary season later in the week. On Tuesday, Fox News announces which 10 presidential hopefuls can participate and the exclusive club will feature notable omissions.

All but three of the 17 major Republican candidates for president participated in a New Hampshire forum Monday night that was essentially a "debate lite." Unlike Thursday's nationally televised debate in Cleveland, the gathering didn't have a cut-off for participation. In their upcoming Ohio meeting, only the GOP's top 10 candidates in national polling will be allowed on stage.

"We never ever envisioned we'd have 17 major candidates," said Steve Duprey, New Hampshire's representative to the Republican National Committee, who helped create the GOP's 2016 debate plan. "There's no perfect solution."

Without exception, the candidates on Monday aimed their criticism at Democrats instead of each other in a two-hour faceoff where Republicans had more in common than not.


Massive California wildfire jumps containment line; evacuees settling in emergency shelters

MIDDLETOWN, California — As firefighters battled a massive Northern California wild land blaze threatening numerous homes, some of the 13,000 people urged to flee their residences were spending what may be just one of many nights in evacuation shelters.

The blaze that has charred nearly 97 square miles of brush and timber, jumped a highway Monday that had served as a containment line. Its rapid growth caught firefighters off guard and shocked residents.

Vicki Estrella, who has lived in the area for 22 years, stayed at a Red Cross shelter at Middletown High School along with her husband and their dog.

"It's amazing the way that thing spread," Estrella said. "There was smoke 300 feet in the air."

Cooler weather had helped crews build a buffer between the wildfire and some of the thousands of homes it threatened as it tore through drought-withered brush in Lake County that hadn't burned in years.


10 Things to Know for Today

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. GOP DEBATE STAGE DRAMA

Seven of the 17 Republican presidential candidates will be left out in the cold when Fox News announces which of them can participate in the first formal debate of the 2016 primary season.


Israel arrests Jewish extremist after West Bank arson that killed a Palestinian toddler

JERUSALEM — Israel's Shin Bet security agency says it is interrogating the suspected head of a Jewish extremist group after an arson attack last week that killed a Palestinian toddler in the West Bank.

The Shin Bet would not say if 23-year-old Meir Ettinger is suspected of involvement in the arson attack Friday. But it says Ettinger is head of an extremist group seeking to bring about religious "redemption" through attacks on Christian religious sites and Palestinian homes.

Israeli media says Ettinger is the grandson of Rabbi Meir Kahane, an ultranationalist whose party was banned from Israel's parliament for its racist views in 1988. Kahane was killed by an Arab gunman in 1990.

Israeli police say Ettinger will be remanded into their custody Tuesday following his arrest Monday.


Consumers enjoying lower energy costs amid rout in prices of fossil fuels

NEW YORK — These days it seems whatever can be burned to power a car, heat a home, make electricity or ship people and goods around the globe is being sold at bargain basement prices.

Prices for coal, natural gas, oil and the fuels made from crude such as gasoline and diesel are all far less expensive than they have been in recent years.

Consumers are rejoicing. Fossil fuel companies are reeling. Countries that import energy, such as the U.S., China, Japan and those in the European Union, are getting an economic boost. Exporters, such as Russia, Saudi Arabia and Venezuela are facing lower income and budget shortfalls.

Commodities in general are slumping. The S&P global commodity index hit its lowest level since 2002 on July 27, lower even than during the 2008 global financial crisis.

The recent price declines are a result of complex factors that have led to a simple outcome: There is more than enough fossil fuels at the ready than customers need.


Crackdown by Egyptian police is increasingly driving disaffected youth to violence, extremism

CAIRO — The 20-year-old law student says he has had enough of fruitless protests in support of Egypt's deposed Islamist president, two years of a losing struggle with police.

Now he wants to join the extremists of the Islamic State group who are battling the army in the Sinai Peninsula.

He and other youths are growing increasingly open in their calls for violence and a move toward extremism, frustrated by the police crackdown since the military ousted President Mohammed Morsi in 2013. Some want to avenge friends and family killed or abused by police.

Once sympathetic to Morsi's Muslim Brotherhood, some of them resent it as weak and ineffectual.

"Now we know there is only one right way: jihad," said the law student, Abdelrahman, showing off scars from pellets fired at him by police shotguns during protests. Like other protesters interviewed by The Associated Press, he spoke on condition he be identified only by his first name for fear of police retaliation.


At Hiroshima's bomb dome, victim finds it hard to look; researcher finds it hard to look away

HIROSHIMA, Japan — The crumbling brick and concrete walls of the Atomic Bomb Dome, as it is known today, rise above the Motoyasu River. The bomb so devastated Hiroshima that there are few other reminders of the city that was here seven decades ago.

"I didn't want to see this place for a long time," said Kimie Mihara, a fragile but straight-backed 89-year-old. She walked slowly around the fenced-off ruin, now roofless save for the dome's skeleton.

On the morning of Aug. 6, 1945, this building was her office. She was running late to work. That's the only reason she's still alive.

"When this was registered as a UNESCO World Heritage site, I thought of coming here. But I still didn't want to see this place," she said.

Rebun Kayo, on the other hand, has made it his life's work to come back, again and again. At the crack of dawn recently, some curious joggers stopped to watch the 38-year-old Hiroshima University graduate student wading in the shallow waters in front of the dome at low tide, under a still-dark sky.


To restore economy, Greece must focus on the basics: stability, investment and simpler laws

ATHENS, Greece — After so much pain, Greece must now figure out how to get its economy back on its feet.

The scale of the country's financial problems is mind boggling — a full quarter of the economy evaporated in the past six years and business activity is now plummeting further. Government cuts needed to qualify for a new bailout will hurt incomes for years to come.

The advice to Greece from economists is simple: focus on the basics.

Have a steady government, simplify the rules of doing business, and rather than try to reinvent the economy, zoom in on sectors that can benefit from small investments: tourism and agriculture, for example.

In many cases, that's easier said than done.


APNewsBreak: Records show deaths of wingsuit BASE jumpers killed in Yosemite remain a mystery

FRESNO, California — World-famous wingsuit flier Dean Potter had strapped his iPhone to the back of his head and hit record before jumping from a cliff in Yosemite National Park in what was to be an exhilarating flight through a V-shaped rocky formation — a route that left little margin for error.

Potter set the phone at this position to capture a video of his partner, Graham Hunt, behind and above him as the pair leaped off the granite diving board at Taft Point, 3,500 feet above the valley.

Twenty-two seconds later the video abruptly stops. The two were killed when they slammed into the ridgeline at 100 mph-plus attempting to soar through the notch in the rock formation called Lost Brother.

Through a records request, The Associated Press obtained investigation reports about the deadly flight on May 16. National Park Service investigators relied heavily on Potter's bashed iPhone, interviews and a series of rapid-fire photos taken by Potter's girlfriend, Jen Rapp, who stayed behind at the launch site as the spotter.

The investigation concluded the deaths were accidental, but despite the video and photos of the jump, officials consider the specific reason why they died a mystery. Investigators listed several possible contributing factors — including indecision, distraction, miscalculation and air turbulence — as the jumpers made split-second decisions.


Cyclical Rangers: Beltre's 3rd career cycle, 6th for Texas since '09, in 12-9 win over Astros

ARLINGTON, Texas — Adrian Beltre became the first major leaguer since the 1930s to hit for his third career cycle and the Texas Rangers held on for a wild 12-9 victory over the AL West-leading Houston Astros on Monday night.

Beltre's solo homer in the fifth, a liner deep into the seats in left field, completed the cycle against three Houston pitchers.

A two-run triple by Beltre in the first inning put the Rangers ahead to stay at 3-2. He had a double in the second and a single in the third before his ninth homer of the season made it 12-7.

All three of Beltre's cycles have come at the Rangers' ballpark, two for the home team and one as a visitor when he was playing for Seattle on Sept. 1, 2008. The third baseman's other cycle for Texas was Aug. 24, 2012, against Minnesota.

The last major leaguer with three career cycles was Babe Herman, who had two in 1931 and one in 1933, according to research provided by the Elias Sports Bureau to the Rangers. The only other big leaguers with three career cycles are Bob Meusel (1921, 1922 and 1928) and John Reilly (twice in 1883 and 1890).

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