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The Latest on weather: Third body pulled from swollen Blanco River; Texas death toll now 13

8:30 p.m. CDT

Authorities say a third body has been pulled from the Blanco River that crested three times above flood stage during relentless storms in Central Texas.

That brings to 13 the number of people killed by the holiday weekend storms in Texas.

Hays County officials say 11 people remain missing in the area. That includes eight people who were in a vacation home that was swept away and slammed into a bridge downstream.

Two 6-year-olds and a 4-year-old were among those inside. They have been missing since early Sunday morning.


AP PHOTOS: A look at the aftermath of torrential rains that caused deadly, destructive floods

HOUSTON — Residents must sort through waterlogged debris after deadly and destructive storms dumped inches of rain from the Hill Country to Houston in Texas, as well as parts of Oklahoma.

More than two dozen people died in the severe weather that hit over Memorial Day weekend, including 13 in the Texas-Mexico border town of Ciudad Acuna, Mexico.

A wall of water roared down the Blanco River in the picturesque Hill Country town of Wimberley on Monday, destroying dozens of homes — including one that was swept downstream and smashed into a bridge.

In Houston, where as much as 11 inches of rain fell in a six-hour period late Monday and early Tuesday, about 2,500 vehicles were abandoned on streets and freeways as drivers escaped for higher ground. As many as 700 homes were damaged in the Houston area.


10 Things to Know for Wednesday

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday:

1. US STAYING THE COURSE, DESPITE GAINS BY ISLAMIC STATE EXTREMISTS

For now, Obama is showing no sign of easing his opposition to sending American forces back into combat in Iraq.


Cleveland, Justice Department reach deal to overhaul police department under federal monitor

CLEVELAND — Cleveland agreed to sweeping changes in how its police officers use force, treat the community and deal with the mentally ill, under a settlement announced Tuesday with the federal government that will put the 1,500-member department under an independent monitor.

The settlement was made public three days after a white Cleveland patrolman was acquitted of manslaughter for his role in a 137-shot barrage of police gunfire that left two unarmed black suspects dead in a car in 2012.

Mayor Frank Jackson said the ambitious plan that was worked out over five months of negotiations with the U.S. Justice Department will be expensive and will take years to put in place. But he said he sees it as a chance to set an example for other cities.

The proposed reforms come amid tension around the U.S. over a string of cases in which blacks died at the hands of police.

"As we move forward, it is my strong belief that as other cities across this country address and look at their police issues in their communities, they will be able to say, 'Let's look at Cleveland because Cleveland has done it right,'" Jackson said.


Detective: Notebook sent by James Holmes describes 'obsession to kill' since childhood

CENTENNIAL, Colorado — In a brown spiral notebook titled "Of Life," Colorado theater shooter James Holmes scrawled a self-diagnosis of his "broken mind" and described his "obsession to kill" since childhood.

He made lists of weapons he planned to buy and included detailed drawings of the theater complete with pros and cons of attacking different auditoriums.

He wrote that his decision to storm the crowded auditorium came after a "lifelong hatred of mankind," and that his failures in graduate school served as the catalyst but were not the cause of the violence.

"Most fools will mistake correlation for causation," Holmes wrote. "The message is there is no message."

However, he also revealed that the "causation is my state of mind for the last 15 years."


Pentagon chief's blunt take on Iraqis' 'will to fight' undercuts Obama's trust in local forces

WASHINGTON — Defense Secretary Ash Carter's blunt assessment that Iraqi forces lack the "will to fight" undermines a central premise of President Barack Obama's strategy for defeating the Islamic State: that Iraq's military can effectively handle ground operations so Americans don't have to.

Carter's comments in a weekend interview reflect deep concern within some quarters of the administration about the capabilities of Iraq's security forces. Despite outnumbering Islamic State forces, the military suffered a major defeat this month in the city of Ramadi. And some officials question whether it can overcome the same sectarian divisions between Sunnis and the Shiite-dominated government that gave the Islamic State space to thrive.

"The failure, it's not one of courage," Marina Ottaway, a Middle East analyst at the Wilson Center, said of the Iraqi military. "It's one of politics."

For now, Obama is showing no sign of significantly shifting his strategy or easing his opposition to sending American forces back into combat in Iraq. Instead, the White House is essentially pleading for patience and even more time to train Iraqis.

"That's a training process that can't be done in a week," White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Tuesday. "That's not a seven-day training course. This is going to require a more sustained commitment."


Obama prods Senate to renew phone-records program for safety of American people

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama called on the Senate Tuesday to extend key Patriot Act provisions before they expire five days from now, including the government's ability to search Americans' phone records.

"This needs to get done," he told reporters in the Oval Office. "It's necessary to keep the American people safe and secure."

But with the May 31 deadline fast approaching, there was scant evidence Tuesday of a search for a deal on Capitol Hill. The House and Senate stood in recess for the week, and a House GOP leadership aide said there were no talks happening between the two chambers. The aide spoke on condition of anonymity, because the aide was not authorized to discuss the issue on the record.

The Senate adjourned for its Memorial Day break early Saturday after a chaotic late-night session during which senators failed to pass a White House-backed House bill reforming the phone collection program. Attempts by GOP leaders to extend current law also repeatedly fell short, amid objections from presidential candidate Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., and others.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell is calling the Senate back into session on Sunday, May 31, just hours before the midnight deadline, but it's not clear lawmakers will have any new solution.


UN reports alarming spike in girls and women used in suicide bombings by Boko Haram in Nigeria

GUBIO, Nigeria — Children are now being seen as potential threats after an "alarming spike" in suicide bombings by girls and women used by Boko Haram militants in northeastern Nigeria, the U.N. children's agency said Tuesday.

The number of reported suicide attacks has jumped to 27 in the first five months of this year compared to 26 for all of last year, it said.

Tuesday's report came as Gov. Kashim Shettima of Borno state visited the site of the latest Boko Haram attack and surveyed the damage: 37 people killed Sunday, 400 buildings razed including mosques, and 22 vehicles and dozens of motorcycles torched.

"I appeal to you not to flee from your homes. We assure you that we are going to rebuild the ancient town of Gubio," Shettima pleaded.

But locals looking at firebomb attacks that left even the earth and trees scorched said hundreds of traumatized residents already have fled to Maiduguri, the Borno state capital 90 kilometers (55 miles) away.


Gunmen try to assassinate Libya's internationally recognized prime minister, spokesman says

BENGHAZI, Libya — Gunmen tried to assassinate Libya's internationally recognized prime minister on his way to the airport in the eastern city of Tobruk on Tuesday, a spokesman for his government said.

Arish Said, head of the government's media department, said that Prime Minister Abdullah al-Thinni's motorcade was attacked and one of his guards was lightly wounded but that there were no fatalities.

"They managed to escape," Said said.

Prior to the attack, he said armed men who had been protesting outside a session of the Tobruk government's House of Representatives tried to storm the building, firing shots into the air and demanding al-Thinni be removed from office.

They were "threatening to kill the prime minister and force the House to sack him," Said said. He identified the men as being funded by "corrupted political financiers" linked to powerful Tobruk tribal leaders, without elaborating.


APNewsBreak: IRS says thieves used online agency service to get access to 100,000 tax returns

WASHINGTON — Sophisticated criminals used an online service run by the IRS to access personal tax information from more than 100,000 taxpayers, part of an elaborate scheme to steal identities and claim fraudulent tax refunds, the IRS said Tuesday.

The thieves accessed a system called "Get Transcript," where taxpayers can get tax returns and other filings from previous years. In order to access the information, the thieves cleared a security screen that required knowledge about the taxpayer, including Social Security number, date of birth, tax filing status and street address, the IRS said.

"We're confident that these are not amateurs," said IRS Commissioner John Koskinen. "These actually are organized crime syndicates that not only we but everybody in the financial industry are dealing with."

Koskinen wouldn't say whether investigators believe the criminals are based overseas — or where they obtained enough personal information about the taxpayers to access their returns. The IRS has launched a criminal investigation. The agency's inspector general is also investigating.

Identity thieves, both foreign and domestic, have stepped up their efforts in recent years to claim fraudulent tax refunds. The agency estimates it paid out $5.8 billion in fraudulent refunds to identity thieves in 2013.

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