Bad News Bearcats: Behind Johnson and Kaaya, Miami rolls past Cincinnati 55-34

bug


We also have more stories about:
(click the phrases to see a list)

People:

Organizations:

Subjects:

Places:

 


MIAMI GARDENS, Florida — The reactions that emerged from the Cincinnati locker room afterward perfectly told the story.

"Disheartening," offered coach Tommy Tuberville.

"Dumbfounded," said defensive end Brad Harrah.

"Awful," was quarterback Gunner Kiel's description.

All fair, all appropriate, and all summed up a miserable Saturday for the Bearcats.

Cincinnati allowed Miami to roll up 621 yards of offense on only 60 snaps, allowed the Hurricanes to score five touchdowns that exceeded 25 yards, and wound up overmatched to the tune of a 55-34 defeat at Sun Life Stadium.

"What you saw is what we've been doing the last five weeks," Tuberville said. "Can't tackle anybody, keep giving up big plays. We looked like the Bad News Bears. ... It's concerning and heartbreaking to watch a lot of guys doing the right thing and then your young guys, they're not young anymore. We've got to start playing. We've got to start tackling."

So to fix that, Tuberville is changing Cincinnati's practices, going to full pads and more hitting. His thinking is simple: More tackles during the week might lead to more tackles on the weekend for the Bearcats (2-3).

"It's disheartening to know we can't get 11 guys playing at the same time," Tuberville said. "The execution just isn't there to make things happen. When we do make contact it's eight to 10 yards downfield and it's not just this game, it's been all year."

Kiel fought through sore ribs to complete 31 of 57 passes for 355 yards and three touchdowns, but was also intercepted three times. His status was the mystery of the week — he said afterward that he knew all along he would play — but his aches and pains are far from Cincinnati's biggest problem right now.

"I played awful. Threw three picks. Can't do that and win a football game," Kiel said.

Duke Johnson rushed for 162 yards and became Miami's career leader in all-purpose yards, while Brad Kaaya threw three touchdown passes plus ran for another for the Hurricanes (4-3).

Phillip Dorsett had three catches for 143 yards for Miami. Joe Yearby added 113 on eight carries for Miami, giving the Hurricanes two 100-yard runners in the same game for the first time since 2003. Gus Edwards added 85 yards on the ground, including had a 40-yard touchdown run.

"I thought all three phases played well and played hard," Miami coach Al Golden said.

Carter Jacobs had a 27-yard fumble return for a late score for Cincinnati, which got three touchdowns in the first 11 minutes of the fourth quarter. Miami got points on nine of its first 13 possessions and averaged 11.9 yards per run and catch, the most by the Hurricanes since a win in 2000 over McNeese State.

Johnson had a career-long 80-yard run for a score in the first quarter for Miami. He now has 4,427 all-purpose yards, passing Santana Moss' mark of 4,394 and doing so in 14 fewer games.

"Duke, I owe you a game ball," Golden said.

Johnson, who rarely discusses his personal achievements, said he appreciated his latest record.

"My coaches and my teammates put me in the best position to get the record," said Johnson, who promised Hucks a game ball if he scored. "I couldn't do it myself."

Kaaya finished 17 of 24 for 286 yards, with a 79-yard scoring pass to Dorsett helping blow the game open in the third quarter. McCord made a juggling grab of an interception — the ball bounced off a receiver, then his own knee before he was able to haul it in, reverse field and find the end zone — to push Miami's lead to 31-10 early in the quarter.

"I'm never satisfied," Kaaya said. "But it was a good day overall for the offense."

Max Morrison had a 45-yard touchdown catch for Cincinnati. Shaq Washington and Mekale McKay also had scoring receptions for the Bearcats.

All content copyright ©2014 Daily Journal, a division of Home News Enterprises unless otherwise noted.
All rights reserved. Click here to read our privacy policy.