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Cool weather all week has firefighters hopeful of major progress against Oregon wildfire

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CANYONVILLE, Oregon — Fire bosses say another four or five days of moderate weather will make a big difference in containing a wildfire in southwestern Oregon's Cascade foothills.

The wildfire 16 miles east of Canyonville continued to grow primarily because of burnout operations to strengthen fire lines, according to the Oregon Department of Forestry.

On Tuesday, the fire perimeter encompassed 27 square miles of private and federal forestland. The blaze was only 10 percent contained since starting last week near the community of Milo in Douglas County.

Smoke has moderated as winds shifted, but the air remained unhealthy in Shady Cove, Medford and Klamath Falls. Weather forecasts call for higher humidity and temperatures in the low 80s all week.

PHOTO: In this Aug. 3, 2015, photo, firefighters work to contain a brush fire near the South Jetty at Fort Stevens State Park in Warrenton, Ore. Numerous other wildfires in California, Washington state and Oregon took off as the effects of drought and summer heat turned the West Coast combustible.  (Joshua Bessex/Daily Astorian via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT
In this Aug. 3, 2015, photo, firefighters work to contain a brush fire near the South Jetty at Fort Stevens State Park in Warrenton, Ore. Numerous other wildfires in California, Washington state and Oregon took off as the effects of drought and summer heat turned the West Coast combustible. (Joshua Bessex/Daily Astorian via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

More than 300 homes remain threatened, but no evacuations were in effect.

On a nearby wildfire that is six miles east of Glide, also in Douglas County, officials said firefighters have turned a corner by strengthening a line that encircled the blaze, which has burned through 1,819 acres. It is 30 percent contained and has cost $3.2 million so far.

On the coast, a 27-acre wildfire closed a popular fishing area near Fort Stevens State Park. There was no word on when it would reopen. Firefighters were mopping up the area.

The fire began Monday afternoon near the park's south jetty, sending up a big column of smoke as it burned through beach grass, brush and pine and spruce trees, the Daily Astorian (http://is.gd/5Z7PCA) reported. The cause was under investigation.

The fire illustrates how dry things are, even at the coast, Warrenton Fire Chief Tim Demers said.

In northeastern Oregon, a wildfire burned 1,500 acres in the Umatilla National Forest seven miles northwest of Elgin. It was 2 percent contained since starting Saturday, burning through grass, brush, logging debris and heavy timber. It threatened 37 homes. Thunderstorms and strong winds were predicted for the area the next three days.

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