Activists say government supporters in Syria hold rare protest after bombings kill 25 children

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Turkish soldiers stand guard at a checkpoint as Syrian refugees from Kobani arrive at the Turkey-Syria border crossing of Mursitpinar near Suruc, Turkey, late Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. U.S.-led coalition airstrikes targeted Islamic State fighters pressing their offensive against a Kurdish town near the Syrian-Turkish border on Tuesday in an attempt to halt the militants' advance, activists said. The south part of Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani is seen in the background.(AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)


Smokes rise after a mortar shell landed in the west of Syrian Kurdish town of Kobani, seen from the Turkish side of border as thousands of new Syrian refugees from Kobani arrive in Suruc, Turkey, late Wednesday, Oct. 1, 2014. U.S.-led coalition airstrikes targeted Islamic State fighters pressing their offensive against a Kurdish town near the Syrian-Turkish border on Tuesday in an attempt to halt the militants' advance, activists said.(AP Photo/Burhan Ozbilici)


BEIRUT — Activists say there has been a rare protest in Syria by hundreds of supporters of President Bashar Assad against the governor of the central Syrian town of Homs after twin bombings killed 25 children.

The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights says Thursday's demonstration occurred after grieving resident gathered at a roundabout in Homs near where the attack took place.

A pro-Assad Facebook youth group in Homs also reported the protest.

In Syria's 3-½-year civil war, open criticism against the government by Assad loyalists has been extremely rare.

It was not immediately clear why the demonstrators specifically demanded the governor's resignation.

Wednesday's twin bombing near a Homs school killed at least 25 children and eight adults.

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