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Q&A: Meet the artist - Luke Buck


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''The Old Mill Pond'' is a painting by Nineveh resident Luke Buck. Buck will be showing his work from Friday through the end of October at Generations Art & Frame in Franklin.
PHOTO BY RYAN TRARES
''The Old Mill Pond'' is a painting by Nineveh resident Luke Buck. Buck will be showing his work from Friday through the end of October at Generations Art & Frame in Franklin. PHOTO BY RYAN TRARES

''Rufus'' is a painting by Nineveh resident Luke Buck. Buck will be showing his work from Friday through the end of October at Generations Art & Frame in Franklin.
PHOTO BY RYAN TRARES
''Rufus'' is a painting by Nineveh resident Luke Buck. Buck will be showing his work from Friday through the end of October at Generations Art & Frame in Franklin. PHOTO BY RYAN TRARES

''Forgotten Trail'' is a painting by Nineveh resident Luke Buck. Buck will be showing his work from Friday through the end of October at Generations Art & Frame in Franklin.
PHOTO BY RYAN TRARES
''Forgotten Trail'' is a painting by Nineveh resident Luke Buck. Buck will be showing his work from Friday through the end of October at Generations Art & Frame in Franklin. PHOTO BY RYAN TRARES


Every painting that Luke Buck does is steeped in nostalgia.

But Buck doesn’t pine for years gone by. Rather, he aims to appreciate the things that are around him now, recording the buildings, landscapes and people that might be gone by the time the next generation comes around.

“I’ll pass an old house or something, I just visualize and imagine all of the families who have been raised in that house. I enjoy that type of thing,” he said.

Buck will share his approach to painting during a workshop Friday that kicks off his annual exhibition at Generation Art & Frame. The Nineveh resident will help teach area artists the skills that he’s used to become a nationally known artist.

The workshop and opening reception will be from 6 to 8 p.m. at the gallery, at 1780 Northwood Plaza, Franklin.

This will be the 17th year that Generation Art & Frame has presented an exhibition for Buck.

Buck grew up in central Indiana surrounded by art and often went out into nature to paint. First taught by his father, artist Harold Buck, he eventually studied drawing at John Herron Art Institute in Indianapolis.

His paintings have been shown in galleries throughout the U.S., and he has participated in dozens of juried art shows, including the Hoosier Art Salon in Indianapolis and the Disney “Festival of the Masters.”

For a number of years, he shared a studio with his father, creating his own artwork while hosting classes to teach others. Buck no longer teaches regularly but does do special events such as the Generations show.

More than 40 paintings and prints will be on display at Generations Art & Frame. The exhibition will last through the end of the month.

What do you as an artist look for to capture in your work?

I’m a nostalgia painter. I like the rural America scenes. It’s not like I have a certain passion, where I want to paint a certain thing. Sometimes, something will just hit me. When you’re an artist, you’re always seeking, always analyzing everything. Sometimes, you’ll be driving down the street and there’s a scene you want to paint. Not old nostalgia, but the things that are around us now, things that you know in a couple of years will disappear.

What are some of your favorite landscapes to capture?

We travel all around the country. But still my favorite paintings come from Indiana. That’s where the heart is. This area right around here, Brown County and south-central Indiana, I love it. It seems like when I paint stuff from here, it’s popular wherever we go around the country. Around here, I do a lot of painting in Atterbury, along Sugar Creek, that I’ve painted many times.

We have a lot of beautiful scenes here. Growing up here has really affected me as an artist. Still does. On my days off, we’ll just take drives out through the country roads. Over the years, you’ve seen a lot of changes. But it’s still a beautiful area.

Who influenced you as an artist?

As I was growing up, I always liked Norman Rockwell, I think everyone always does. And Andrew Wyeth was one of my favorite artists.

Then when I really got intense with it, there were so many to mention, depending on their technique. I’ve been lucky, I’ve gotten to meet a lot of my heroes over the years. I’m a traditional artist, so I like the traditional painters.

What’s the value in coming in and teaching other people the things that you have learned?

I’m a ham and I enjoy it. It’s satisfactory to teach. You can pass it on, more or less. It’s interesting and encouraging when you see other people who want to do it. When we had our own studio many years ago, we had classes, and then I’d do workshops. Now I only do a few workshops. My father was an artist, and I’ve been around art all my life. It’s kind of hard to explain it to people, because it’s all I’ve known.

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