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Franklin police favor working 12-hour shifts


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A nearly five foot tall ribbon in front of the Indiana Masonic Home this week shows the community's support for the Franklin teens involved in the tragedy on the Big Blue River earlier this month.
A nearly five foot tall ribbon in front of the Indiana Masonic Home this week shows the community's support for the Franklin teens involved in the tragedy on the Big Blue River earlier this month.

A nearly five foot tall ribbon in front of the Indiana Masonic Home this week shows the community's support for the Franklin teens involved in the tragedy on the Big Blue River earlier this month.
A nearly five foot tall ribbon in front of the Indiana Masonic Home this week shows the community's support for the Franklin teens involved in the tragedy on the Big Blue River earlier this month.


More police officers will be on duty at the same time in Franklin if the city changes to longer shifts.

Next year, the Franklin police chief has proposed having patrol officers begin working 12-hour shifts, the same type of schedule already used by other local police departments. City board of works members were in favor of the plan and will vote in July.

Currently three to five officers typically work during each of the three nine-hour shifts in a day. By changing to 12-hour shifts, eight or nine officers will be working at the same time, Franklin Police Chief Tim O’Sullivan said.

Officers asked the chief to consider switching to a 12-hour schedule after hearing positive feedback from other local departments, including the Johnson County Sheriff’s Office and Greenwood and New Whiteland police departments, O’Sullivan said.

About 70 percent of Franklin officers voted in favor of the switch, he said. Officers wouldn’t work more than three days in a row and would have every other weekend off, O’Sullivan said. One issue officials are considering is finding ways to make sure officers stay energized and alert while on duty.

The only cost increase is $1,300 because an additional sergeant will be needed to supervise a shift, but the city will save more money long term by eliminating at least 234 hours of overtime paid to lieutenants and sergeants each year, O’Sullivan said. Officers would work 5:30 to 5:30, and two officers would come in a half-hour early to create some overlap between shifts, he said.

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