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City footing bill to clear concrete away before upgrading road


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The Indiana National Guard was going to pay to remove large pieces of concrete and other items left at a former concrete plant on Worthsville Road in Greenwood. Now that removal is the responsibility of the city. 
PHOTO BY SCOTT ROBERSON
The Indiana National Guard was going to pay to remove large pieces of concrete and other items left at a former concrete plant on Worthsville Road in Greenwood. Now that removal is the responsibility of the city. PHOTO BY SCOTT ROBERSON

The Indiana National Guard was going to pay to remove large pieces of concrete and other items left at a former concrete plant on Worthsville Road in Greenwood. Now that removal is the responsibility of the city. 
PHOTO BY SCOTT ROBERSON
The Indiana National Guard was going to pay to remove large pieces of concrete and other items left at a former concrete plant on Worthsville Road in Greenwood. Now that removal is the responsibility of the city. PHOTO BY SCOTT ROBERSON


The price to widen and redevelop a Greenwood road just got higher.

The city is paying $600,000 to remove large pieces of concrete from a former concrete plant along Worthsville Road. Previously, the city had not included that cost in the approximately $21 million price tag for the project because the Indiana National Guard was planning to pay for the work.

But federal spending cuts forced the National Guard to delay the work, and the city didn’t want to hold up its project to widen Worthsville Road from two to four lanes. Now, the city plans to pay $600,000 to break into pieces, haul away and dispose of the concrete that is left. Greenwood is paying for the work out of loan money for the road project, which the city redevelopment commission unanimously approved spending on the old concrete plant this week.

The Indiana National Guard had been dismantling the former Prairie Materials concrete plant, located on Worthsville Road east of U.S. 31, and agreed to pay for demolishing the whole facility, which had sat unused for years. The property was considered an eyesore, and the city bought the land to build a rainwater collection pond on it.

The National Guard started work last summer and had been taking pieces of the facility to Camp Atterbury and the Muscatatuck Center for Complex Operations in Jennings County to use as part of a training facility.

But federal furloughs delayed the National Guard’s work at the old concrete plant in October, and it was further delayed by tightened federal budgets, Greenwood community development services director Mark Richards said.

The former concrete plant is on 10 acres on the north side of the road. About two acres of the property are in a floodplain and not considered suitable for redevelopment, so the city is using the site to absorb most of the runoff of rainwater from the widened road.

City plans call for a one-acre rainwater collection area, a 23-space parking lot and trailhead for walkers or bikers who want to use a nearby trail.

The city had planned to start widening Worthsville Road in May, but delays, including difficulty in getting a final parcel of land by eminent domain, prevented the work from starting until this spring. Even with the road project delays, the chunks of concrete remaining at the site are beginning to hold up the Worthsville Road project, Richards said.

The road has been closed for construction since March and is expected to stay closed until late fall.

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