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Apartments vexing homeowners


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An apartment building that has been given an initial approval to be built on this lot behind homes near the intersection of Fry Road and State Road 135. Scott Roberson / Daily Journal
An apartment building that has been given an initial approval to be built on this lot behind homes near the intersection of Fry Road and State Road 135. Scott Roberson / Daily Journal

Bob Eberg talks about the apartment building that has been given an initial approval to be built behind his home near the intersection of Fry Road and State Road 135. Scott Roberson / Daily Journal
Bob Eberg talks about the apartment building that has been given an initial approval to be built behind his home near the intersection of Fry Road and State Road 135. Scott Roberson / Daily Journal

Bob Eberg talks about the apartment building that has been given an initial approval to be built behind his home near the intersection of Fry Road and State Road 135. Scott Roberson / Daily Journal
Bob Eberg talks about the apartment building that has been given an initial approval to be built behind his home near the intersection of Fry Road and State Road 135. Scott Roberson / Daily Journal


A Greenwood man and nearly 50 of his neighbors walked out of a plan commission meeting this week, feeling their worries about an apartment complex planned nearby didn’t matter.

Bob Eberg had gotten a letter from the city informing him that apartments were planned for a property near the southeast corner of Fry Road and State Road 135, and the 24-unit building would be about 300 feet from his property in the Foxmoor neighborhood.

He and his neighbors are concerned about what kind of tenants the apartments will bring, whether the building style will match the brick homes in their subdivision, how much traffic will increase and how an apartment building might impact their property values.

The city plan commission approved combining two lots so the apartment building can be built and allowed residents to share concerns about the project. The commissioners told the Foxmoor residents they couldn’t stop the project, though, because the apartment building would be appropriate for the property’s commercial zoning.

“I don’t want an apartment house right next to me,” Eberg said. “I’m not happy about it, but what can I do about it?”

The Foxmoor neighborhood is quiet, and the homes usually sell before owners stick for-sale signs in their yards, homeowners association president William Woodman said. Residents are concerned an apartment building would change that.

The area doesn’t have apartments nearby and is mostly single-family residential properties.

Some of the closest apartment buildings are on Smith Valley Road, and there’s a definite need in the area for more apartments, developer William Toller said.

Toller, who has owned the land for about 10 years, expects construction to begin within 90 days so Treybourne South can open by the end of the year.

The Greenwood Plan Commission gave the project an initial approval Monday and next needs to approve the site plan.

The apartments will not be government-subsidized and will offer one-, two- and three-bedroom options and about five garages, he said. Rent prices haven’t been set yet.

The apartments are supposed to be higher-end, with garage space, but the developer hasn’t defined what high-end means, Greenwood director of community development services Mark Richards said.

The property is 1.54 acres with a parking lot, and the developer will not be permitted to construct the building closer than 33 feet from other properties because of utility easements, planning director Bill Peeples said.

Eberg said what he had hoped for at the plan commission meeting Monday night was answers to questions, such as what the apartments would look like, whether they will be low-income housing and if water draining off the development would wash onto his property.

Woodman also shared concerns at the meeting, asking how much traffic would increase and if the apartments would have balconies allowing apartment residents to look into nearby backyards. He also wondered what the rent prices would be, where the developer would have security lighting and if trash trucks would be noisy and scatter trash.

The board members were sympathetic but said they couldn’t stop a project that was appropriate for the zoning of the property, Eberg said. He added that the city board also said the man representing the Treybourne South owner didn’t have to answer questions.

“I felt like we were all just jerked around,” Eberg said. “Nothing was answered.”

Woodman said he worries about residents who live on Van Dyke Way, such as Eberg, if the apartments are built.

“They’ll never see the sunset in their backyards. They will not have much privacy in their backyards at all,” he said. “I think it will eventually affect the property values.”

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