PORTLAND, Ore. — A 44-year-old man who admitted to killing an assistant truck weighmaster in Oregon has been sentenced to life in prison with a minimum of 25 years served before he’s eligible for parole.

The sentence Dirck White received Tuesday in Clackamas County will be combined with one he is already serving in California, where in 2016 he was ordered to serve over 38 years stemming from a shootout with police in Hollywood.

The shootout happened nearly 10 months after the killing of 47-year-old Grady Waxenfelter in Oregon. Court records show White also faces rape of a child charges in Pierce County, Washington.

White said in court that he didn’t plan to kill Waxenfelter after being pulled over near Boring, Oregon, in February 2014. He said he fired in retaliation for every instance of misconduct by police, prosecutors and corrections officers that he’s seen over his lifetime.

“It doesn’t excuse what I did, but that’s the reason,” White said, according to a video recording from KPTV.

Tedra Waxenfelter, the victim’s wife, told White that her husband was just doing his job when he was killed.

“Grady was a wonderfully kind man that left an impression on everyone he came in contact with,” Tedra Waxenfelter said according to a video recording from KOIN. “If you hadn’t done what you did to him that day, you too would have been a better person just from meeting him.”

According to court documents, Waxenfelter had taken a family friend on a ride-along when he spotted White hauling a trailer without a license plate. Waxenfelter’s duties included issuing traffic citations.

White shot Waxenfelter three times and drove away. Waxenfelter died at the scene while White spent months on the run before his arrest in California. The friend who was with White was not hurt.

The handgun used in Waxenfelter’s killing was also used in the California shootout.

White was hurt in the shootout but no officers suffered injuries.

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