“Operator Down” (Dutton), by Brad Taylor

“Operator Down,” Brad Taylor’s latest in his best-selling Pike Logan series, showcases a few of the best supporting characters in another tale that feels like it’s just ahead of tomorrow’s headlines.

Taylor worked in Special Forces, and previous novels featuring Logan and his counterterrorism unit known as The Taskforce have always felt authentic. In “Operator Down,” the author showcases the invisible world of the diamond industry. Aaron Bergman and his partner, Shoshana, work for Mossad and once in a while they find themselves working with Logan and his team. Since the mission seems somewhat straightforward, Aaron accepts the assignment without telling Shoshana.

With it being officially unsanctioned by his government, Aaron also doesn’t want to get her involved unless it’s absolutely necessary. He takes another woman with him instead, making Shoshana jealous, but the woman has keen knowledge he can use. She knows the diamond market, and the case involves following someone in the Israeli Diamond Exchange who might attempt to discredit the government.

What is actually going on is much worse when it’s revealed that an American arms dealer is trying to purchase components that could be used to piece together a successful nuclear weapon.

Logan and his team at first find a reluctant Shoshana who doesn’t want their help, but after an attempt on her life, she finds herself working with The Taskforce again to rescue Aaron and save the day, though her ruthlessness and skills might be more a hindrance than helpful.

Taylor is one of today’s premiere authors writing about the world of special ops and the characters of the team have become familiar and comfortable to long-time fans. Newcomers shouldn’t be deterred since Taylor knows how to quickly immerse readers in his world.


Online:

https://bradtaylorbooks.com/

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JEFF AYERS
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