NEW YORK — A year of relentless headlines generated by President Donald Trump’s first year in office, natural disasters and mass shootings are reflected in the images selected by Associated Press photo editors as the best of 2017.

AP photographers captured the moments before Trump took office as he peaked out from behind doors at the U.S. Capitol steps to take the oath of office. Trump’s advisers also shared time in the spotlight. White House counsel Kellyanne Conway was the subject of a viral image as she sat perched on her knees on an Oval Office couch in February.

The aftermath of mass shootings in Las Vegas and Texas is depicted in several of AP’s photos as victims struggled to recover and loved ones mourned their loss. Attacks in New York, Spain and England were illustrated with photos of the immediate response and later remembrances, including a throng of people gathered for a moment of silence in Barcelona after an August attack that killed 13.

Natural disasters provided some of the most striking images of the year. Rescue workers are shown scouring through the rubble following September’s earthquakes in Mexico. First responders took to boats in the flooded streets of Houston as Hurricane Harvey swamped the city. AP photographers also documented the damage and devastation left behind by Hurricanes Maria and Irma. And they captured a series of chilling images stemming from the violence in Myanmar.

Nature also gave photographers and sky watchers one of its most stunning spectacles this year in the form of a total eclipse across parts of North America. The AP documented each step of moon’s path across the sun from numerous places around the country. One of the AP’s top images is a multiple exposure photograph detailing the celestial show over the famed St. Louis Arch.


The photos can be seen here: https://apimagesblog.com/blog/2017/11/28/2017-in-review-news

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The Associated Press
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