SAN FRANCISCO — The Latest on a ruling by the California Supreme Court on the legality of a farm worker law (all times local):

1:25 p.m.

One of the nation’s largest fruit farms says it plans to appeal a ruling by the California Supreme Court that boosted organized farm labor in the state.

Gerawan Farming said Monday that it intends to ask the U.S. Supreme Court to review the decision.

California’s highest court upheld a law that aims to ensure labor contracts for farmworkers whose unions and employers don’t agree on wages and other working conditions.

The ruling came in a lawsuit pitting Gerawan Farming against the United Farm Workers of America, the union that Cesar Chavez helped launch.

Labor activists say the law prevents employers from stalling labor negotiations to avoid a contract that could benefit farmworkers. Opponents call it government overreach that deprives employers and workers of any say over wages and other terms of employment.


10:25 a.m.

The California Supreme Court has upheld a law that labor activists say is key to helping farmworkers improve their working conditions.

The 2002 law allows California to order unions and farming companies to reach contracts if the sides are at an impasse. A mediator can impose a contract on the employer that sets wages and other working conditions.

The court said Monday that the law didn’t violate the state Constitution.

The ruling came in a lawsuit pitting one of the largest U.S. fruit farms, Gerawan Farming, against the United Farm Workers of America, the union that Cesar Chavez helped launch.

Labor activists say the law prevented employers from stalling contract talks to avoid a deal. Opponents called it government overreach that deprived employers and workers of any say over wages and other terms of employment.


12 a.m.

An upcoming ruling by California’s highest court in a legal battle between the union launched by labor leader Cesar Chavez and one of the nation’s largest fruit farms could dramatically reduce the power of organized farm labor in the state.

The California Supreme Court is expected to decide Monday whether a law allowing the state to order unions and farming companies to reach binding contracts is unconstitutional.

Labor activists say the mandatory mediation and conciliation law is key to helping farm workers improve labor conditions.

Opponents say it’s government overreach that deprives agricultural employers and workers of a say over wages and other terms of employment.

The state Supreme Court’s ruling will come in a lawsuit pitting Gerawan Farming, one of the nation’s largest fruit farms, against the United Farm Workers of America.