TULSA, Okla. — The Latest on a white former Tulsa police officer acquitted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man going to work for the sheriff’s office in a neighboring county (all times local):

3:30 p.m.

The lawyer for a former Tulsa police officer who resigned after being acquitted in the killing of an unarmed black man says her client plans to speak to a group of about 3,500 officers about what to do if they’re charged in a shooting.

Betty Shelby resigned from the Tulsa police department in July but was sworn in Thursday as an unpaid reserve deputy for the nearby Rogers County Sheriff’s Office.

Attorney Shannon McMurray says Shelby will speak in Nashville, Tennessee, during the Fraternal Order of Police national convention later this month. McMurray says Shelby will tell the group of officers to have a lawyer in mind and a plan if they are involved in a shooting.

Shelby was found not guilty in May of manslaughter in the shooting death of Terence Crutcher.


2:20 p.m.

An Oklahoma sheriff says a thorough review shows his county’s reserve deputy program is “squeaky clean” after a volunteer deputy in neighboring Tulsa was convicted of manslaughter last year in a high-profile shooting.

Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton made the comments Thursday after his newest reserve deputy — former Tulsa police officer Betty Shelby — was sworn into the job.

Shelby was found not guilty in May of manslaughter in the shooting death of an unarmed man while she was on patrol in 2016.

While acknowledging some legitimate concerns about Shelby’s safety in the field, Walton said he remains confident in her abilities.

Walton said he reviewed his county’s reserve deputy program after the shooting of an unarmed black man by a 73-year-old white reserve deputy who said he confused his stun gun with his handgun.


10:35 a.m.

A white former Tulsa police officer who resigned after being acquitted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man has been sworn in as a reserve deputy sheriff in a neighboring county.

Wearing a firearm on her hip and a Rogers County Sheriff’s Office uniform, Betty Shelby took her oath of office Thursday morning.

Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton has been an ardent supporter of Shelby and a critic of Tulsa County prosecutors for pursuing manslaughter charges against her.

Walton says Shelby’s duties haven’t been determined, but she will serve in a volunteer capacity and will not be paid.

Shelby was found not guilty in May of manslaughter in the shooting death of Terence Crutcher as he stood near his SUV on a Tulsa street.


6:40 a.m.

A white former Tulsa police officer who resigned after being acquitted of manslaughter in the fatal shooting of an unarmed black man is going to work for the sheriff’s office in a neighboring county.

Rogers County Sheriff Scott Walton told the Tulsa World that Betty Shelby will work for his office. He did not say what her duties will be.

Shelby was found not guilty in May of manslaughter in the September shooting death of Terence Crutcher as he stood near his SUV, which was stopped in the middle of a Tulsa street.

Shelby returned to the Tulsa Police Department in an administrative position, but resigned in July, saying she felt isolated from other officers.

Walton is a former Tulsa police officer who supported Shelby as she awaited trial.