JOHANNESBURG — The Latest on South African parliament’s vote on no-confidence motion in President Jacob Zuma (all times local):


7:35 p.m.

A jubilant South African President Jacob Zuma has thanked supporters after surviving a no-confidence vote in parliament. He has survived previous attempts but this was the first by secret ballot.

Zuma is attacking what he calls “propaganda through the media that the ANC is no longer supported by the people. They will realize in 2019 when we win in a big number once again.”

Anger over numerous allegations of corruption against Zuma has caused some within the ruling African National Congress to call for the president to step aside. Dozens of ANC members in parliament supported the no-confidence motion.

The ANC is expected to replace him as party leader when it meets in December.


6:45 p.m.

A motion of no confidence in South African President Jacob Zuma has failed in parliament after months of growing anger over alleged corruption and a sinking economy.

Zuma had survived six previous attempts to unseat him in parliament, but this was the first to be held by secret ballot. Opposition parties had hoped it would encourage disgruntled legislators with the ruling African National Congress party to vote against Zuma, who has faced numerous allegations of graft while South Africa’s economy has fallen into recession.

Zuma’s term continues until elections in 2019. The ANC is expected to replace him as party leader at its meeting in December.


4:50 p.m.

South Africa’s parliament has begun voting on a no-confidence motion in President Jacob Zuma. While the president has survived several such votes in the past, this is the first to be conducted by secret ballot.

If the no-confidence motion succeeds, Zuma will have to resign immediately. He has been under fire for numerous allegations of corruption.

The no-confidence motion needs 201 votes to succeed, or a simple majority of parliament’s 400 seats. But because five parliament seats are currently vacant, the opposition wants the count to be based on 395 seats instead.

The ruling African National Congress holds a majority of parliament seats, but the opposition sought the secret ballot in the hope that disgruntled party members would vote against the president without fear of retaliation.


3:45 p.m.

The debate in South Africa’s parliament over a no-confidence motion in President Jacob Zuma is also a debate over the future of the ruling African National Congress.

The former liberation movement has led South Africa since the first all-race elections in 1994, but some parliament members warn that the ANC will lose support if Zuma is allowed to stay in office.

If the no-confidence motion succeeds, Zuma will have to resign immediately. He has survived such votes in the past, but this is the first to use a secret ballot.

The ANC had its worst showing last year in municipal elections as Zuma faced allegations of corruption.


2:15 p.m.

South Africa’s parliament has convened to vote on a no-confidence motion against South African President Jacob Zuma. If it succeeds, he must resign immediately.

The head of the main opposition Democratic Alliance party, Mmusi Maimane, is urging lawmakers to “take our country back.”

Zuma has survived six previous attempts to unseat him in parliament, but this will be the first to be held by secret ballot. Opposition parties hope it will encourage disgruntled legislators with the ruling African National Congress party to vote against Zuma.

The president has faced numerous allegations of graft while South Africa’s economy has fallen into recession.


1:35 p.m.

If the no-confidence motion against South African President Jacob Zuma succeeds today in parliament, Zuma must resign immediately and the parliament speaker will become acting president.

Constitutional expert Pierre de Vos at the University of Cape Town says the rest of the administration would continue its work for an interim period of up to 30 days until the country’s chief justice convenes a special parliament session to elect a new president.

If the ruling African National Congress party, which has the clear majority in parliament, cannot agree on a candidate in that time, new national elections would be held. A similar replacement process kicked into gear after the ANC recalled former President Thabo Mbeki in 2008.


1:20 p.m.

South Africa’s main opposition party is accusing President Jacob Zuma of “derelict leadership” in its draft resolution in parliament asking for his removal from office.

Parliament is set to vote in the coming hours on the motion of no confidence, and if it succeeds, Zuma must resign.

The draft of the motion by the Democratic Alliance has been tweeted by parliament. It says Zuma’s shuffling of finance ministers has “resulted in a collapse of public confidence” in the president and harmed the country’s poorest and most vulnerable citizens.

The draft also says Zuma has “lost all sense of rationality and sound judgment.”

South Africa slipped into recession earlier this year.


12:25 p.m.

South Africa’s parliament is preparing to vote on a motion of no confidence in embattled South African President Jacob Zuma. If the motion succeeds, he must resign.

Parliamentary speaker Baleka Mbete on Monday made the surprise decision to allow Tuesday afternoon’s vote to be conducted by secret ballot. Opposition parties hope that will encourage disgruntled legislators from the ruling African National Congress party to vote against the scandal-ridden Zuma.

The ANC holds a majority of the 400 parliament seats, and the party has repeatedly said its members will not support the opposition-led attempt to unseat the president.

The no-confidence motion needs 201 votes to succeed. Zuma has survived several past no-confidence votes.

Demonstrations both for and against Zuma are planned in front of the parliament building before the much-anticipated vote.