ANCHORAGE, Alaska — The Latest on the eruption of Alaska’s Bogoslof Volcano (all times local):

2:25 p.m.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory says a volcano in the Aleutian Islands spewed ash for about three hours.

An explosive eruption began at about 10 a.m. Monday Alaska time and continued until 1 p.m. at Bogoslof (BOH-gohs-lawf) Volcano about 850 miles (1,400 kilometers) southwest of Anchorage.

The National Weather Service issued a message warning aviators of an ash cloud up to 34,000 feet (10,365 meters).

Ash clouds above 20,000 feet (6,100 meters) can threaten jet airliners traveling between Asia and North America. Ash can harm and even stop engines and pilots take measures to fly over or around clouds.

The observatory monitored the eruption with seismic, infrasound, satellite and lightning data. Seismic activity declined but remains above background levels.

The observatory says low-level ash emissions may be continuing and could intensify without warning.

Bogoslof has been erupting on and off since mid-December.


11:50 a.m.

The Alaska Volcano Observatory reports the latest eruption of a volcano in the Aleutians Islands sent up an ash cloud that could affect jet traffic.

Bogoslof (BOH-gohs-lawf) Volcano erupted at 10 a.m. Monday.

A pilot reported seeing the accompanying ash cloud at 32,000 feet (9,750 meters).

Ash clouds above 20,000 feet (6,100 meters) can harm jet airliners traveling between Asia and North America.

Pilots warned of ash clouds fly over or around them to avoid engine damage.

The observatory says seismic and infrasound data suggested that the ash emission continued after the initial eruption.

Winds were pushing the cloud south. No hazards for communities were expected.

Bogoslof has erupted periodically since mid-December. The volcano is 850 miles (1,400 kilometers) southwest of Anchorage.

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