INDORE, India — New Zealand reached 28-0 at stumps on day two of the third test against India on Sunday but still trail the hosts by 529 runs.

The tourists’ openers Martin Guptill was unbeaten on 17, while Tom Latham was batting on 6.

Earlier, India had declared their first innings at 557-5.

India’s innings featured a mammoth fourth-wicket 365-run stand between Virat Kohli (211) and Ajinkya Rahane (188), which was finally broken after tea. Jeetan Patel (2-120) trapped Kohli lbw.

It was also the second highest partnership for India against New Zealand, behind 413 runs by Vinoo Mankad-Pankaj Roy in Chennai in 1956, and also their fifth highest partnership for any wicket in test cricket.

“It feels really special that we were 100-3 and we added 365 runs. I was struggling yesterday, but today I just wanted to dominate once I got my hundred,” said Ajinkya Rahane after the day’s play.

Kohli faced 366 balls, including 20 fours, and scored his second double hundred in test cricket. Rahane faced 381 balls, and hit 18 fours and 4 sixes. Both batsmen achieved their highest individual test scores in the process.

“Virat was batting so fluently. Yesterday I was struggling a bit, and he told me to enjoy it. I just wanted to bat long. That confidence from your captain or your partner is really important when you’re batting together,” Rahane added.

Rahane then added 41 runs with Rohit Sharma, who reached 51 not out, but he was denied the chance to get his maiden double hundred and was caught behind off Trent Boult (2-113).

The declaration came after Sharma completed his seventh test fifty.

With three days remaining, New Zealand will have to work hard to make India bat again.

“In any test our top seven batsmen have to set the tone, but we haven’t done that in the first two matches. Here we have been shown a blueprint of how to play on it. We know we’ve got three massive days ahead but we’ll start with tomorrow,” said New Zealand coach Mike Hesson.

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