MONROE, La. — Recovery from spring floods is slow in south Monroe, but work is going well in Caldwell Parish.

Elizabeth Splond of Monroe said she hasn’t been able to sleep in her house since March, when she wound up hospitalized with throat problems from mold.

“I stayed here at least two good weeks before I knew the mold would get all in your lungs and everything,” she told The News-Star ( ).

Splond is among many people in Monroe’s southside with flood recovery problems, Police Juror Pat Moore said.

Some cannot prove that they own their houses beucase they inherited them informally, without a written will, she said. Moore said others have landlords who are repairing their own homes before fixing apartments they own.

Moore estimated that as many of 20 percent of people in her district couldn’t get assistance, because of such problems. In the future, she hopes to hold educational classes about the need to write wills and hold onto important paperwork.

Caldwell Parish homeland security director Dale Powell says about 1,500 homes in his parish were affected, and most of the owners are back home.

David Jackson, in the Hebert community, said flood insurance paid off the mortgage on the home he had owned for four years.

“Our house was totaled by the flood,” Jackson said. “We had 39 inches of water in the house for two months. It cracked the foundation and the wood was deteriorated.”

Now his new house is going up on Lake Lafourche. He hopes to move in by Christmas.

Roddy Fluitt, a subcontractor on the project, said many homeowners in Hebert had to rebuild and others had to rip out the lower 3 feet of their drywall or paneling.

“Everybody, and there are roughly 850 registered voters in Hebert, all helped one another,” Fluitt said. “One thing about Hebert is it’s a great community. There are a good bunch of people out here.”

This story has been corrected to show Elizabeth Splond stayed at her house a couple of weeks, not days, before being hospitalized.

Information from: The News-Star,

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