CHASKA, Minn. — Capsules of Sunday’s single matches at the Ryder Cup:

Patrick Reed, United States, def. Rory McIlroy, Europe, 1 up.

A leadoff match that lived up to its billing, 13 of the 18 holes were halved, and a four-hole stretch on the front nine left the gallery breathless. Reed squared the match by driving the fifth green to 8 feet for birdie. They halved the next two holes with birdies, and after McIlroy holed a 60-foot birdie putt on No. 8, Reed answered with a 35-foot birdie putt to halve. McIlroy’s putter cooled, however, starting with a 5-foot par putt on No 9 that would have won the hole. Reed went ahead with a 6-foot par on No. 12, McIlroy missed a 5-foot par that would have won the 13th, and Reed pulled 2 up with a birdie from the bunker on the 16th. With McIlroy in tight for a chance at a half, Reed closed him out with a 7-foot birdie.

Henrik Stenson, Europe, def. Jordan Spieth, United States, 3 and 2.

Spieth now is 0-4 in singles at the Presidents Cup and Ryder Cup. He opened with a birdie and led through most of seven holes until Stenson birdied the eighth and nine to pull ahead, then took a 2-up lead on the 13th when Spieth went in the water. They matched birdies on the 15th, and Stenson ended it with an eagle on the 16.

Thomas Pieters, Europe, def. J.B. Holmes, United States, 3 and 2.

Holmes built a 2-up lead when Pieters opened with a bogey and Holmes made a birdie, only for Pieters to answer with two straight birdies. It was back-and-forth for most of the front nine until Pieters went ahead for good with a birdie on the par-5 11th. He won the 14th with a birdie to go 2 up, and closed out the match with a birdie on the 16th. Holmes made only three birdies.

Rickie Fowler, United States, def. Justin Rose, Europe, 1 up.

Fowler came into the Ryder Cup having never won a match, and he left having won two of them. Fowler made bogey on the opening hole to fall behind, and he never took the lead until a birdie on the par-5 16th. They halved the par-3 17th with pars, and Fowler dodged another bullet when Rose had a 12-foot birdie putt to halve the match on the 18th hole, only to leave it short. Rose had a six-match unbeaten streak coming into the week. He went 2-3-0 for the week.

Rafa Cabrera Bello, Europe, def. Jimmy Walker, United States, 3 and 2.

Walker was the only American who never had the lead at any point in his singles match. Cabrera Bello went 2 up when Walker bogeyed the par-3 fourth hole, and another bogey by Walker on No. 9 stretched the lead to 3 up. Walker ran off three straight birdies to cut the deficit to 1 down through 12 holes, only for the Spaniard to birdie the par-3 13th and closed out the match when Walker made bogey on the par-3 16th.

Sergio Garcia, Europe, halved with Phil Mickelson, United States.

Reed and McIlroy got all the attention, but Mickelson and Garcia played the best golf from start to finish. So good was the golf that Mickelson made four straight birdies and was only 1 up through five holes. Garcia won the first two holes on the back nine for a 1 up lead, Mickelson responded with a birdie on the toughest hole at No. 12, and it was a battle to the end. Garcia squared the match with a birdie on the 16th. Mickelson made an 25-foot birdie putt on the 17th, and Garcia matched his birdie from 10 feet. Mickelson made an 18-foot birdie putt on the final hole, and Garcia matched him again from 8 feet to halve the match. They combined for 19 birdies, and both would have shot 63 in medal play.

Ryan Moore, United States, def. Lee Westwood, Europe, 1 up.

Moore wasn’t even on the team a week ago Sunday and wound up making the point that clinched victory for the American. Westwood shook off his missed 2-foot putt that cost Europe on Saturday afternoon. Neither player was more than 1 up until Westwood made a birdie on the 15th hole to go 2 up and appear headed to victory. Moore hit to 7 feet on the par-5 16th for an eagle, he birdied the 17th to square the match and he won on the 18th when Westwood went bunker-to-bunker and made bogey. His point gave the Americans 14 1/2 points needed to win the Ryder Cup.

Brandt Snedeker, United States, def. Andy Sullivan, Europe, 3 and 1.

Snedeker was the only player who went undefeated at Hazeltine. Sullivan had not played since Friday morning, and the Ryder Cup rookie came out firing with two birdies for a 2-up lead through three. He didn’t make another birdie until the 16th hole. Snedeker made back-to-back birdies to go 2 up through eight holes. He matched birdies with Sullivan on the 16th to stay 2 up, and he put him away with a final birdie on the 17th hole that moved the Americans within a half-point of winning.

Dustin Johnson, United States, def. Chris Wood, Europe, 1 up.

Johnson has never lost a singles match in his three Ryder Cups, and this was the first one to reach the 18th hole. Johnson took the lead for good with a birdie on the par-3 eighth hole and he went 2 up with a birdie on No. 10. Johnson looked as though he would have the clinching point for the Americans until he missed a 4-foot birdie putt on the 16th hole to go dormie. They halved the next two holes for a 1-up victory.

Brooks Koepka, United States, def. Danny Willett, Europe, 5 and 4.

The only American rookie to qualify for the team, Koepka had the shortest of singles matches. Willett struck first with a birdie on No. 2 and still lead until Koepka holed out for eagle on No. 7 for a 1-up lead. Koepka won three straight holes with a Willett bogey and two straight birdies, and he closed out the match by holing a 6-foot par to halve the 14th hole.

Martin Kaymer, Europe, def. Matt Kuchar, United States, 1 up.

Kuchar had four birdies in the opening seven holes to put the German on his heels, and this match appeared to be an American victory early. Kaymer didn’t give away any holes, however, and cut the deficit to 1 down when Kuchar bogeyed the 13th hole. Kaymer took it from there with three straight birdies to build a 1-up lead, and they halved the final three holes.

Zach Johnson, United States, def. Matt Fitzpatrick, Europe, 4 and 3.

Fitzpatrick played only two matches in his Ryder Cup debut, and neither was memorable. He bogeyed the opening hole to fall behind and it took until his birdie on the par-3 eighth to square the match. He gave away the next hole with a bogey, Johnson went 2 up with a birdie on the 10th and he was on his way. Johnson played bogey-free, and his third birdie of the match on the 15th to win.