RALEIGH, N.C. — The Latest on heavy rains and flooding in central North Carolina (all times local):

5:30 p.m.

Flooding has led two North Carolina school systems to cancel classes on Friday.

Cumberland County Schools said on its web page Thursday that while students won’t have to come to school on Friday, it will be an optional workday for teachers. Special programs and all athletic activities are canceled.

Fort Bragg Schools are also closed on Friday. Hoke County Schools are on a two-hour delay.

The National Weather Service says showers and thunderstorms are in the forecast for the Fayetteville area through Friday night.

12:30 p.m.

Communities around Fort Bragg and as far north as the Raleigh suburbs are bracing for more heavy rain and flooding after downpours that closed schools and threatened to burst a dam.

Meteorologist Nick Petro at the National Weather Service in Raleigh said slow-moving storm clouds were expected to dump another couple of inches of rain to the south and east of Raleigh on Thursday.

Petro says a river north of the Fort Bragg Army base broke a 70-year flood record. Petro says a nearby dam at Carvers Creek State Park is at risk of bursting, which could swamp nearby homes and roads.

Overnight storms that dumped as much as 8 inches of rain overnight forced boat rescues from rising waters at a Fayetteville group home and from stranded cars.

9:40 a.m.

Heavy rains are delaying the start of school in some counties in North Carolina.

Storms dropped several inches of rain around Raleigh and to the south overnight Wednesday, knocking out power to some customers.

Flash flood warnings were in effect until midmorning Thursday in Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke and Moore counties. A number of roads were also closed. The National Weather Service says up to 8 inches of rain has fallen in the area and as much as 2 more inches could fall Thursday.

Schools in all four counties were opening two hours later than usual.

Duke Energy reported more than 2,000 customers were without service early Thursday.

Police in Burlington also reported problems overnight, with nearly three dozen calls for flooded roads.

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